Suggestions for books?

9 Aug

If we were to get new titles for the collection in the wom*n’s room, what would you suggest? It doesn’t matter if you’ve read them or not, or whether you use the wom*n’s room or not.

Here are some to get the ball rolling.

 

Feminism For Real: Deconstructing the academic industrial complex of feminism. By Jessica Yee.

“When feminism itself becomes its own form of oppression, what do we have to say about it? Western notions of polite discourse are not the norm for all of us, and just because we’ve got some new and hot language lately in equity-seeking movements like feminism — such as  “intersectionality” — to use in our talk, it doesn’t necessarily make things change in our walk (i.e. actually being anti-racist).

Confronting the sometimes uncomfortable questions feminism has made us  ask about what’s going on FOR REAL paved the many paths that brought the contributors of this book together to share their sometimes uncomfortable truths, not just about feminism, but about who they are and where they are coming from.

Against a backdrop exposing a 500+ year legacy of colonization and oppression, Feminism FOR REAL explores what has led us to the existence of “feminism”, who gets to decide what it is, and why. With stories that make the walls of academia come tumbling down, it deals head-on with the conflicts of what feminism means in theory as opposed to real life, the frustrations of trying to relate to definitions of feminism that never fit no matter how much you try to  change yourself to fit them, and the anger of changing a system while  being in the system yourself.

 

Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity, Julia Serrano

“A provocative manifesto, Whipping Girl tells the powerful story of Julia Serano, a transsexual woman whose supremely  intelligent writing reflects her diverse background as a lesbian transgender activist and professional biologist. Serano shares her experiences and observations both pre- and post-transition to reveal the ways in which fear, suspicion, and dismissiveness toward femininity shape our societal attitudes toward trans women, as well as gender and sexuality as a whole. Serano’s well-honed arguments stem from her ability to bridge the gap between the often-disparate biological and social perspectives on gender. She exposes how deep-rooted the cultural belief is that femininity is frivolous, weak, and passive, and how this “feminine” weakness exists only to attract and appease male desire. In addition to debunking popular misconceptions about transsexuality, Serano makes the case that today’s feminists and transgender activist must work to embrace and empower femininity in all of its wondrous forms.”

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